Study: Instagram’s “New Posts” Affecting Creators?

On March 22, 2018, Instagram announced that they were introducing a New Posts button to make posts in the timeline more likely to appear chronologically – see the full details in Instagram’s announcement here: https://instagram-press.com/blog/2018/03/22/changes-to-improve-your-instagram-feed/

Following the announcement, SYLO immediately launched a research study to see how (if at all) this change would affect creators (i.e. influencers) on Instagram. As part of this study, SYLO analyzed 61 Instagram creator  accounts (which were authenticated in the SYLO platform) and these accounts 6,068 Instagram posts that were posted between January 1, 2018 and April 22, 2018, to see if their engagement and reach metrics could have been affected by the change.

As part of the research, SYLO analyzed the likes and comments that the creators received on each post within each of the first few hours after publishing the post to see if their engagement traction could have been affected by the change, since the change was meant to increase the number of posts that would appear chronologically.

SYLO analyzed the creators’ post metrics for 2018 leading up to the change (January 1, 2018 – March 21, 2018) and compared that to these same creators’ post metrics for the month following the change (March 22, 2018 – April 22, 2018).

Here are the three key findings from this research:

1. Creators received post engagements much more quickly
After the Instagram algorithm change, the average creator received a much larger percentage of their total engagements in the first hour after their posts were published than they had received before the algorithm change, with an increase of 19% for likes and 18% for comments. (Total engagements are the combined likes and comments collected for seven days after the post is published.)

2. Follower growth per day increased exponentially
From March 22, 2018 – April 22, 2018, the creators analyzed saw an average 520% increase in follower growth per day compared to January 1, 2018 – March 21, 2018. This average accounted for extreme outliers, so SYLO also calculated a trimmed average of 64% increase in follower growth per day, which accounts for the removal of these extreme outliers on both ends of the spectrum.

3. Posting increased by 23% month-over-month
Comparing the creators month-over-month, in the month after the change (March 22, 2018 – April 22, 2018), creators posted 23% more than they did in the month prior to the change (February 21, 2018 – March 21, 2018). SYLO analyzed the month prior to that (January 20, 2018 – February 20, 2018) to see if this was a trend, and found that during that time period, on average, creators posted 11% more than they did from February 21, 2018 – March 21, 2018. In other words, the creators analyzed were posting less in the month before the change than they were two months before the Instagram algorithm change, and that trend reversed in the month after the Instagram algorithm change.

If you would like to receive a verified performance analysis of your influencer marketing efforts, please contact SYLO at contact@meetsylo.com!

 

Image source: Unsplash

SYLO Featured in The National’s Article on Fake Followers

The National has just published an article diving into how influencer marketing space can tackle fake followers and grow as a whole. SYLO‘s Co-Founder and COO Erick Schwab was featured in the article, giving his insight on this topic. Here is an excerpt from the article:

Fake followers (essentially social media accounts masquerading as real but controlled by automated systems) can be unmasked by companies such as Sylo, by looking for patterns of activity that are automated in nature. As a result, they can begin to assess who are the fake influencers, too.

“You can use technology to look like an influencer,” says Schwab. “There have been studies where people launched Instagram accounts and built up enough numbers over three months for brands to want to work with them. But by monitoring things like reach of posts, how content is consumed and how it’s responded to, we are able to measure the things that really matter.”

The gold rush that characterised the early days of the influencer industry will slow down now, he says, as a consequence of all this scrutiny. “It’s going to become divided into professionals and amateurs,” he says. “Some people will have a genuine influence over an audience that a brand will pay for, and that advertising will be worthy of those dollars.”

Read the full piece by clicking here!

Want to learn how SYLO is providing third-party audience and data verification for the influencer marketing space? Contact us here!

 

Image source: Pixabay

Five Tips for Your Social Content Strategy

SYLO conducted a study on 4,334 pieces of branded influencer content, and the themes which were present in each piece of content, to analyze the most recurring content themes as well as the highest performing content themes. These pieces of content were posted by a random selection of 35 influencers in SYLO’s platform whose content can contain any of, or up to, the 85 content themes SYLO assigns in our content categorization process.

Performance was determined using the SYLO Score (learn more here) by calculating the average of the scores for each content theme present the overall content sample.

Here are several findings from the study:

1. Top 5 performing content topics

The top five topics, or themes, present or discussed in the content analyzed are ranked here:

  1. Motivational
  2. Advice/Recommendations
  3. Cars
  4. Beauty
  5. Collaboration


2. Top 5 most frequently used content topics

The study found that none of the top five most used content themes ranked in the top five performing content themes. The most frequently used theme, Lifestyle, ranked #24 in the overall list of top performing content themes.

  1. Lifestyle
  2. Fashion
  3. Food
  4. Personal Stories
  5. Beauty


3. Love of food and art isn’t always reciprocated

Though food was the third highest occurring content theme in the sample set, it just missed the top 10 performing content themes, coming in at #11, followed by art at #12.


4. Don’t wake up early to catch the sunrise

When comparing time of day content themes, SYLO’s study found that content featuring sunsets outperform sunrises by 67%! However, posts during the daytime outperformed nighttime posts by 3x.


5. A human element resonates with audiences

Our content themes also include whether the post includes a human or not. The study found that photos including a human element averaged a 28% higher score than those that did not.


If you want to find out the verified data-supported content themes and benchmarks where you or your creator partners perform best, contact the SYLO team
by clicking here.

 

Image source: Pixabay

Study: Creators and Brand Integrations

SYLO conducted a research analysis of 100 creators to analyze their influencer marketing brand integrations, which we classify as brand-paid ads, promos/reviews, and unpaid mentions. Below is a breakdown of what each of these delineations mean:

  • Brand-Paid: When a brand partners with a creator and pays them to post an ad for the brand.
  • Promo/Review: When a creator’s post is promoting and/or reviewing products or services they’ve received for free from a brand.
  • Unpaid Mentions: When a creator promotes a brand and explicitly states that they have no affiliation, or if the creator is promoting something of their own (e.g. merchandise or clothing line).

These brand integrations are attributed based first on any disclosure by the creator, and then on the context of the content if disclosure does not fully define the terms of their partnership with the brand. When a creator registers and authenticates their social media accounts in SYLO’s platform, our team of content analysts with the help of AI analyze each and every native and branded post that a creator has published. These posts are tagged with the brand (if any), the type of integration (mentioned above), and categorized using content themes that are present in that post. (You can learn more about this process by clicking here.)

Of these types of brand integrations, paid/sponsored made up 51%, promos/reviews made up 46%, and unpaid mentions accounted for nearly 3%.

The average amount of brands per creator analyzed in this study were as follows:

  • Brand-Paid: 24
  • Promos/Reviews: 22
  • Unpaid Mentions: 2

Furthermore, 100% of the creators analyzed had at least one brand integration that was paid for by the brand, and 99% had at least one brand integration that promoted/reviewed a product or service.

While the brand-paid ads and promo/reviews must be disclosed as an ad, according to FTC regulations, an unpaid mention does not. Also pointed out by the FTC, when disclosing ads, it is not sufficient for a creator to just include terms such as “#sp,” “Thanks [Brand],” or “#partner”.

Find out more about how SYLO ensures FTC compliance, brand safety, and fraud/bot identification for influencer marketing advertisers at www.meetsylo.com.

 

Image source: Pixabay