Giving Brands & CMOs Exactly What They Want: Verified Influencer Marketing Data

This is the fourth and final video in David Beebe‘s series featuring SYLO‘s CEO Brett Garfinkel, discussing how the biggest problem in influencer marketing, that is verification and transparency, can be solved. CMOs and brands are demanding standardized reporting and measurement, yet are getting unverified data, conflicting reports, and no understanding of ROI. You can view the full discussion below, and view the whole series by clicking here.

David and Brett presented a webinar on why CMOs and brands are demanding third party independent reporting, measurement, and verification of influencer marketing data. View the presentation by clicking here!

 

Image source: Pixabay

Finding the True Creators Among the Influencers

In this most recent video in David Beebe‘s series on how to keep the influencer marketing space from stalling, he interviews SYLO‘s CEO Brett Garfinkel to discuss how third-party verified data and benchmarks will set the true creators apart from the slew of influencers.

As Brett states in the interview: “Creators are putting out so much content across so many subject matters, they often get siloed into one category, but with the right data, influencers can see what works best, identify new opportunities, and use independent third party verified data to present to brands to close more deals.” See the full interview below! Click to view the first and second videos in this series.

View the whole series by clicking here!

Image Source: Pixabay

Will This Algorithm Solve the Biggest Problem Facing Influencer Marketing?

Content Decoded‘s David Beebe has released the latest video in his series, as well as an accompanying article, on what’s needed to prevent the influencer marketing space from stalling in 2018. The first video featured SYLO‘s CEO, Brett Garfinkel, and can be viewed by clicking here. This latest video features tech entrepreneur, Michael Montero, to discuss the biggest threat to influencer marketing. Check out the video below and let us know your thoughts in the comments or by emailing contact@meetsylo.com!

View the whole series by clicking here!

Image source: Pixabay

Will Influencer Marketing Stall in 2018?

Introducing the first video in Content Decoded‘s David Beebe‘s latest series featuring SYLO‘s CEO and Co-Founder Brett Garfinkel, where they discuss what’s needed to prevent the influencer marketing space from stalling in 2018. Check out the video below and let us know if you agree or disagree in the comments below, or by emailing brett@meetsylo.com.

View the whole series by clicking here!

Part Four: Three Tips for Social Influencer Cross-Promotions

By Erick Schwab, COO and Co-Founder at SYLO

We’ve reached the final post in our four-part blog series that will present tips to recap what we’ve covered so far. This series was based off of SYLO’s research study that was featured in a recent presentation that I gave at Buffer Festival in Toronto. Here are posts 1-3 of the series in case you need to catch up:

  1. Part One: Cross-Promoting Content On Social Media
  2. Part Two: Social Influencer Cross-Promotion Study
  3. Storytelling Insights You Need to Know

Utilizing the data, insights, and strategies that we’ve explored in this series, here are three tips on how you can create a comprehensive cross-promotion influencer marketing strategy.

  1. Data, Data, Data!

Marketers should be informed when preparing the content and creator strategies for their influencer campaigns. As stated in a recent MarTech Today article, “If you want to be a better marketer, you need to start with clean data.” By utilizing third-party, independent data sources that provide influencer, platform, and campaign performance, and content benchmarks (see: SYLO), you can truly have a data-driven influencer marketing strategy.

  1. Play to the Creator’s Strengths

Utilizing content benchmarks (see Part Three) to understand which topics resonate with audiences on various social media platforms will ensure that you’re reaching any and all engaged audiences for that creator. It’s rare that a creator only has “influence” on one topic or theme. Though the creator may be regarded as a “beauty influencer,” the creator may also see high performance in other areas such as parenting and pets – which could open up new opportunities to pitch relevant brands with the data showing this “influence.” This can also vary by social media platform. It’s important for both the brand and creator to understand the combination of topics and social media platforms that drive the highest performance and authenticity.

  1. Tailored Cross-Platform Strategies

Our study (see Part Two) found that YouTube videos that were cross-promoted scored 47% higher than those that weren’t cross-promoted. However, this needs to be a consistent strategy, and one that is tailored to each platform. In post three of this series, we explored how one creator used the same caption across all of the social media platforms where she cross-promoted her YouTube video – these posts may have performed much better if she had tailored her caption to a style that typically resonates with her audience on that platform.

Thank you for joining us for this deep-dive into the world of cross-promoting social influencer content. The three other posts in this series can be found below. If you want to find out if you’re forming the right partnerships, and utilizing the right content on the right social media platforms, check out www.meetsylo.com or email us directly at contact@meetsylo.com to access third-party unbiased measurement and reporting!

 

More posts from this series:

  1. Part One: Cross-Promoting Content On Social Media
  2. Part Two: Social Influencer Cross-Promotion Study
  3. Part Three: Storytelling Insights You Need to Know

 

Image source: Pixabay

Part Three: Storytelling Insights You Need to Know

By Erick Schwab, COO and Co-Founder at SYLO

This is part three of our four-part blog series based off of SYLO’s research study that was featured in a recent presentation that I gave at Buffer Festival in Toronto. In case you missed posts one and two, you can view them here:

  1. Part One: Cross-Promoting Content On Social Media
  2. Part Two: Social Influencer Cross-Promotion Study

This series’ third post dives into the storytelling insights that marketers and creators alike need to know!

As a quick recap of the study that produced these insights: using the SYLO Score, we analyzed nearly 500 pieces of influencer marketing content produced by creators to see if cross-promotion of their YouTube videos led to better performance. We found that YouTube videos that were cross-promoted scored 47% higher than those that weren’t cross-promoted, and creators with cross-promotions accounting for more than 10% of their branded content saw a 58% higher score on average for that content.

To illustrate the best practices that drove these performance rates, we compiled the case study featured below.

Keep in mind that a SYLO Score of 50 is good, as these are content benchmarks. Here we can see that YouTube and Twitter outperform Facebook and Instagram, when analyzing this beauty creator’s social media platform performance.

Tailoring the Messaging

Taking a look at the cross-promotion content produced for a brand partnership, we see that her Twitter content scored highest, followed by Facebook, but Instagram is not resonating well. Note that all of her content used had the same exact caption. As cross-promotion content typically drives up a creator’s YouTube video performance, perhaps varying the caption, particularly on Instagram, to a style that typically resonates with her audience would further boost both the Instagram and YouTube contents’ performances.

Know the Content Themes

One thing that often holds back influencer marketing strategies is that they only focus on the category or theme that the creator is known for, in this case: Beauty. However, beauty isn’t the only theme she utilizes (or that resonates with her audience). For example, across Twitter and YouTube, this beauty creator’s content performs well when it features product reviews or advice/recommendations, but not so much on Instagram.


And you can see this reflected in another brand campaign that she produced content which she cross-promoted:

The key takeaway here is to know what content themes resonate with your audiences across each and every social platform!

The final post in this series will zero in on how you can create a comprehensive cross-promotion influencer marketing strategy. In the meantime, you can read the other posts in this series by clicking the links below, or check out www.meetsylo.com to get insights into your content, storytelling, influencer, and social media platform strategies using our third-party measurement and reporting dashboard. You can also email us at contact@meetsylo.com!

More posts from this series:

  1. Part One: Cross-Promoting Content On Social Media
  2. Part Two: Social Influencer Cross-Promotion Study
  3. You’re reading it!
  4. Part Four: Three Tips for Social Influencer Cross-Promotions

Image source: Pixabay

Part Two: Social Influencer Cross-Promotion Study

By Erick Schwab, COO and Co-Founder at SYLO

This is the second post in our four-part blog series based off of SYLO’s research study that was featured in a recent presentation that I gave at Buffer Festival in Toronto. The first post is filled with stats and insights into the digital, social media, content marketing, and influencer marketing landscapes, and can be read here.

This second post now dives research study that SYLO conducted on several influencers and their content to analyze storytelling and cross-promotion trends.

The main question SYLO set out to answer with this study was: “How can brands activate influencers’ audiences and support their storytelling initiatives across every social channel?”

To answer this, SYLO conducted a study on nearly 489 pieces of branded content produced by creators on our platform who have cross-promoted their YouTube videos on other social media platforms. We measured the performance of these posts with the SYLO Score, the standardized metric for influencer marketing. Here is a quick overview of the SYLO Score:

The performance data on the content in this study is verified, accurate, transparent, and independently reported.

127 of the 489 pieces of branded content we analyzed were YouTube videos. 37% of those videos were cross-promoted on Facebook, Twitter, and/or Instagram. 63% were standalone videos i.e. not cross-promoted.

Findings:

  1. We found that YouTube videos that were cross-promoted scored 47% higher than those that weren’t cross-promoted.
  2. Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram content that cross-promoted the YouTube videos had an average 9% higher SYLO Score than any other type of content on those platforms.
  3. Creators with cross-promotions accounting for more than 10% of their branded content saw a 58% higher score on average for that content…proving that Consistency is Key!

So how can we use these findings to tell better stories? The next post in this series dives into the storytelling insights that marketers need to know! If you haven’t already, be sure to read the first post in the series on the landscape in which influencer marketing is quickly claiming a larger and larger stake.

More posts from this series:

  1. Part One: Cross-Promoting Content On Social Media
  2. You’re reading it!
  3. Part Three: Storytelling Insights You Need to Know
  4. Part Four: Three Tips for Social Influencer Cross-Promotions

Image source: Pixabay

Part One: Cross-Promoting Content on Social Media

By Erick Schwab, COO and Co-Founder at SYLO

Recently, I gave a presentation at the Buffer Festival in Toronto title “Audience Engagement: Driving Content Back and Forth on Social Media” during the event’s industry day for brands. Our four-part blog series, based off of SYLO’s research study that was featured in the presentation, will address these main themes:

  1. Stats you need to know.
  2. Overview of the findings from the research study that SYLO conducted.
  3. Strategies for storytelling and cross-promoting influencer content on social media.
  4. How you can create a comprehensive cross-promotion influencer marketing strategy.

This first post in the series is filled with stats and insights into the digital, social media, content marketing, and influencer marketing landscapes.

Digital

As reported by Mashable, We Are Social and Hootsuite compiled a Global Digital Snapshot earlier this year to give the world a view into the world of internet and all things digital. Here are some findings that we found particularly interesting:

  • The total global population is 7.524 billion people
  • The total number of internet users is 3.819 billion people
  • The total number active social media users is 3.028 billion people

Social Media

The We Are Social/Hootsuite Global Digital Snapshot then dove into how many users each platform is attracting, including:

  • Facebook – 2.047 billion users
  • YouTube – 1.5 billion users
  • Instagram – 700 million users
  • Twitter – 328 million users
  • Snapchat – 255 million users
  • Pinterest – 175 million users
  • LinkedIn – 106 million users

Content Marketing and Influencer Marketing

As covered by MediaPost, PQ Media’s annual Global Content Marketing Forecast 2017 report found that global content marketing revenues are seeing 14% growth year-over-year, with 2016 coming out at $28.1 billion, and pacing at 14% for 2017.

PQ Media’s report also found that content marketing in the U.S.A. surpassed $12 billion in 2016, accounting for 44% of the global market share.

Diving down deeper into the influencer marketing space, IZEA’s 2017 State of the Creator Economy study found that 69% of U.S. marketers have allocated budget for influencer marketing.

What To Do With This Data

These statistics show that more and more budget is being allocated to content marketing, storytelling, and influencer marketing strategies that appeal to the vast audiences across the various social media platforms.

But how do you know which platforms to post on? Should you post on more than one platform? How can you create a content strategy that appeals to these various audiences?

Our next blog post in the series dives into the findings from SYLO’s research study which yielded best practices for storytelling and cross-promotion. Check out http://meetsylo.com to learn more about 3rd-party standardized measurement for influencer marketing!

More posts from this series:

  1. You’re reading it!
  2. Part Two: Social Influencer Cross-Promotion Study
  3. Part Three: Storytelling Insights You Need to Know
  4. Part Four: Three Tips for Social Influencer Cross-Promotions

Image source: Pixabay

Influencer Marketing Is a Team Sport

By Erick Schwab, COO and Co-Founder at SYLO

This is part two of our series on standardized measurement helping both creators and brands move the influencer marketing space forward. Click here to check out part one which recaps the conversations Team SYLO had with the Buffer Festival creator attendees on the need for standardized measurement to increase partnership investments in the space.

To ensure a better tomorrow, the creator and brand communities must participate in solving influencer marketing’s standardized measurement problem.

Social media platforms are making huge decisions: where and how will content be shown and distributed, revenue shares, and other big-ticket items that are hard to exert any executive power over. In response, creators are banding together more in the hopes of influencing social media execs, as showcased in this video made by a famous YouTube creator, Casey Neistat.

Brands, on the other hand, have a marketing budget and goals to achieve. They need to require independent, standardized measurement for influencer marketing (same as all other media they purchase) so that they can support their spend. It’s too great of a risk to spend ever-increasing amounts of their marketing budget on a marketing medium that they are unable to quantify and compare against, say, the same spend on TV. So far, they have been working with several metrics that don’t translate to all the other media purchased for a campaign:

  • Engagement
  • Views
  • Likes
  • Subscribers

…and a few others. However, while these metrics tell them that something in their influencer campaigns is working, it doesn’t tell them what that is or why.

If the creator community started to leverage all of its performance data, it would unlock a solution to marketers’ burning question – where should we spend our money to make more money!. Otherwise, marketers will continue to see influencer marketing as something experimental with an unclear ROI.

2018 needs to be the year in which we make sure that the word ‘experimental’ is no longer associated with influencer marketing. To make that happen, we need to make standardized measurement our priority. By partnering up with SYLO, creators can show brands everything they need to see measurement-wise and, I guarantee, these brands will want to invest more of their budget in the data-verified creators.

Photo credit: Pixabay

Standardized Measurement Will Help Creators Win Long-Term Brand Partnerships

By Erick Schwab, COO and Co-Founder at SYLO

During my recent trip to Toronto, I had the chance to participate in a couple of events organized by the good folks from Buffer Festival. I met a lot of smart creators who work with brands on a daily basis. They create awesome content for these brands, but are dealing with an ever-growing challenge of bridging the gap from storytelling to finding out how their work impacted brands’ goals.

We also discussed current influencer marketing trends, problems, and future perspectives. Almost all of our discussions ended on the same note: influencer marketing has great potential and is already living up to some of it, but there is a bigger opportunity on the horizon. That opportunity involves shifting huge TV and programmatic ad budgets over to influencer-based marketing; maturing from experimental marketing to a core part of a brand’s marketing mix.

Everyone who I talked to agrees that our industry’s biggest problem is standardized measurement. It’s a problem for brands who need to justify their investments with verified data, but it’s also rapidly becoming a problem for creators, who find it difficult to secure more mutually beneficial long-term brand deals.

When Third-Party Measurement Is Established, Brand Investments Follow

I’ve been reading that we can expect an uptick of branded posts in the coming years. Some figures show that their number will be close to $35 million by the end of 2019. In fact, the influencer ad market is now worth $1 billion and, with projected increase in posts, that number will only grow.

That sounds like a lot, right?

To put that into context, brands are spending around $71 billion on TV ads and around $83 billion on digital advertising per year (2016 was the first year in which digital surpassed TV). In addition to that, the video marketing industry is expected to break $135 billion in the US alone this year. That’s a total of $289 billion dollars being spent on three different (and broad) marketing channels. Projected influencer marketing spend (those $1 billion) in 2017 is exactly 0.34 % of those astronomical budgets!

We can all agree that TV would not see that level of ad spend if Nielsen ratings (standardized measurement) didn’t allow marketers to effectively gauge what they are getting in return.

Now, imagine the same type of standardized measurement serving as a driving force for influencer marketing. Once marketers have the same degree of confidence in the ROI of influencer marketing, and can benchmark it against TV ads and programmatic (those video ads you see all over the web), it’s going to bring with it marketing budgets the creator community has never seen before. Just picture what the landscape would look like if 20-30% of TV ad budgets are reallocated and made available for creators? The industry would explode – more work for creators, better returns for brands, more incentives for platforms to further develop their features – and that’s just the beginning!

We have an opportunity to do just this. If we can offer actionable numbers to marketers, they will choose creators – not TV, not billboards, not programmatic – and there’s no doubt about that. They just need to see that their investment is working, in black and white, from an independent third party.

This is part one of a two-part series on how standardized measurement will help both creators and brands move the influencer marketing space forward. Stay tuned for part two which demonstrates why influencer marketing is a team sport.

Photo credit: Pixabay