SYLO Featured in The National’s Article on Fake Followers

The National has just published an article diving into how influencer marketing space can tackle fake followers and grow as a whole. SYLO‘s Co-Founder and COO Erick Schwab was featured in the article, giving his insight on this topic. Here is an excerpt from the article:

Fake followers (essentially social media accounts masquerading as real but controlled by automated systems) can be unmasked by companies such as Sylo, by looking for patterns of activity that are automated in nature. As a result, they can begin to assess who are the fake influencers, too.

“You can use technology to look like an influencer,” says Schwab. “There have been studies where people launched Instagram accounts and built up enough numbers over three months for brands to want to work with them. But by monitoring things like reach of posts, how content is consumed and how it’s responded to, we are able to measure the things that really matter.”

The gold rush that characterised the early days of the influencer industry will slow down now, he says, as a consequence of all this scrutiny. “It’s going to become divided into professionals and amateurs,” he says. “Some people will have a genuine influence over an audience that a brand will pay for, and that advertising will be worthy of those dollars.”

Read the full piece by clicking here!

Want to learn how SYLO is providing third-party audience and data verification for the influencer marketing space? Contact us here!

 

Image source: Pixabay

SYLO Featured in The New York Times!

As a follow-up to The Follower Factory article that was published in February 2018, The New York Times just released another article to explore how agencies are using technology to fight influencer marketing bot and fraud issues. SYLO’s technology was included in this article, along with insights from SYLO’s Co-Founder and COO, Erick Schwab. Mediacom was one of the agencies featured in the article:

““In the absence of direct pressure on the platforms, it’s a way for advertisers to take more control of their own spend and not be at the mercy of the platforms themselves,” said Jeff Semones, head of social media at MediaCom, which has recommended SYLO to clients.”

Read the full article by clicking here!

Want to learn how SYLO is providing third-party verification and data transparency to the influencer marketing space? Contact us here!

 

Image source: Pixabay

Influencer Marketing’s Big News Day

Thursday, January 11th, was a big day in news for the influencer marketing space. From Facebook’s Newsfeed algorithm changes to Google’s changes to promote brand safety and ad transparency, SYLO has rounded up the latest articles which tackle how these announcements will affect the influencer marketing space.

1. Google Preferred and Ad Transparency

Sparked by the outrage caused by Logan Paul’s “suicide forest” video, a January 11th article in Bloomberg Technology stated that, “Google told partners that it plans to use both human moderators — the company recently announced it will have 10,000 employees focused on the task — as well as artificial intelligence software to flag videos deemed inappropriate for ads.”

Google then followed this up with a blog post on January 16th in which they outlined their plans for “stricter criteria for monetization on YouTube,” the manual reviews of Google Preferred channels, as well as their plans for more “transparency and simpler controls over where ads appear.”

Here at SYLO, we wholeheartedly support this approach, particularly for the manual review of posts. This will greatly increase transparency, authenticity, and brand safety in the space, and it is a practice that SYLO has employed from the beginning.

2. Facebook’s Newsfeed Algorithm Changes

Also, on January 11th, Facebook’s Mark Zuckerberg announced that the social media platform’s algorithm will start prioritizing friend’s posts over brands and publishers in the News Feed. This is a good thing for the influencer marketing space, as addressed in great detail in this Digiday article.

Here at SYLO, we believe that Facebook will prioritize creators that have built a strong community, have a two-way interaction with fans, and create authentic content. Moreover, it speaks to how important creators are to the social media space in general. Social media platforms (including YouTube, as mentioned above) are making adjustments to better support a growing ecosystem of quality content creation. As featured on Inc. (also on January 11th), Facebook also recently launched two new tools, an app and a Facebook for Creators website, to further empower creators to create quality content on the platform.

The Facebook Newsfeed algorithm change is yet another reason for brands to allocate more budget into the influencer marketing spacebesides already being a workaround for ad blockers, they are also now a workaround for this new Facebook algorithm.

3. Influencer Talent Agencies Called Out

Finally, on January 11th, another Digiday article dove into how influencer talent agencies are amplifying their social numbers that they report for campaign and creator success. As stated in the article, “Brands often preach “quality” engagement but seek big numbers, which means influencer networks are often scrambling to make up big goals.”

This is the biggest threat to the influencer marketing space stalling in 2018. If those who are matching and executing the influencer marketing campaigns are allowed to continue to self-report, success metrics will continue to be inflated and risk brand safety and creator authenticity. This is why standardized measurement was adopted by every other form of legitimate advertising media, and it needs to be adopted by the influencer marketing space if we are to justify the investments and increase budgets into the space going forward.


We’d love to hear your thoughts on these recent pieces of news in the comments below or contact us at
contact@meetsylo.com!

 

Image source: Pixabay

Top 3 Most Viewed Posts of 2017

SYLO launched the SYLO Blog in June 2017 with the announcement of our third-party measurement standard for influencer marketing, and since that month have seen a 149% growth in views of our blog posts. Below, we’ve pulled together recaps and links to the most read SYLO blog posts of 2017all of which can give tips for your 2018 influencer marketing strategies!

1. Influencer Marketing in Desperate Need of Verification and Transparency

Digital marketing is under major scrutiny these days. CEOs of major international corporations (P&G, Unilever, Bank of America) are threatening to pull their marketing dollars if companies and platforms (YouTube, Facebook, Instagram, and, to an extent, Google) don’t solve their reporting and measurement problems. Marketers are tired of spending their budget dollars without the safety net that is independent third-party verification and measurement, which builds trust and establishes credibility. This carries over into influencer marketing, which has massive potential but is sorely lacking when it comes to verification and measurement. Read more by clicking here!


2. Can Anyone be a Social Influencer?

Technology is enabling anyone and everyone to declare herself or himself an “influencer.” On the one hand, any of us can be an influencer in the most literal sense: co-workers, friends, family, acquaintances, strangers, and pets can influence our decisions and views all day long, whether it be in-person or online. On the other hand, in the realm of influencer marketing, brand marketers should be focusing on “creators” rather than just “influencers” – and if they’re going to use these two words synonymously – then no, not everyone can be an “influencer”. Read more by clicking here!


3. Is Influencer Marketing Still Experimental?

Answer: If you’re activating your first few campaigns then yes, it’s experimental. However, the costs will balloon up quickly, making its ‘experimental’ status unsustainable in the long run. That’s why it’s important to plug influencer marketing into your core marketing mix as soon as possible. Treat it as you would any other media you purchase so it can be evaluated equally against contributes to your overall goals. Integrating influencer marketing into your core marketing strategy and benchmarking it against past practices allows you to see its effectiveness in relation to everything else you’re doing. It also gives you an opportunity to measure the impact that influencer marketing is having on your other marketing mediums – what it boosts and by how much. Read more by clicking here!

The SYLO Team wishes all of our readers the happiest of holidays and much success in influencer marketing and beyond in 2018!

 

Image source: Pixabay

Top 8 Insights for Influencer Marketing Heading into 2018

By Brett Garfinkel and Erick Schwab, Co-founders of SYLO

With 2017 coming to a close, the SYLO team pulled together all of the trends we’ve analyzed, and now present to you in the form of these top eight insights for your influencer marketing efforts heading into 2018.

1. No one likes to be interrupted

Disruptive ads aren’t something that people look forward to. Platforms have been getting brands excited by trying to make ads less “disruptive” i.e. six-second bumper ads. But what it comes down to is that people really don’t care about what brands have to say about themselves in their ads. That’s why the rise of ad blocking software (600 million devices now block ads) and more than 85% of people skip TV and pre-roll ads.

Brands need to add to the story instead of interrupting it—and influencer marketing is an excellent solution. The key to developing great influencer campaigns is finding what already works for the creator and blending seamlessly into that narrative. 6-second ads and intrusive, sale-sy content just don’t qualify—they are as far from storytelling as you can possibly be.

Related: Stop Interrupting And Start Being A Part Of The Story


2. Influencer Marketing needs to be part of your core marketing mix

Influencer marketing campaigns are generally found on social media, but brands often neglect to connect it to their overarching marketing goal to see how it’s performing in relation to their other media investments. Instead of just using social media influencer campaigns to get exposure and engagement, think of ways to extend them to reap more benefits. For example, you could get creators to work behind the scenes to foster new relationships for your brand. Or, you could connect your influencer campaigns with TV ads and radio and billboard campaigns to increase impact and put out a coherent, uniform message across a variety of different channels.

Another point of consideration is SEO. While it is considered ‘below the line’ marketing, it can still benefit from the ‘above the line’ activities. Partnering up with ‘micro’ influencers (bloggers, reviewers) can expose your content to different audiences, plus your link diversity gets a significant boost, which will eventually affect your SERP rankings.

Related: Influencer Marketing In The Core Marketing Mix


3. No more one-off campaigns or fake influencers

Technology is enabling anyone and everyone to declare herself or himself an “influencer.” In the realm of influencer marketing, brand marketers should be focusing on “creators” rather than just “influencers”. Not only do the “influencers” need to be authentic creators, but brands looking to partner with them should focus on authentic relationships with these creators. Authenticity, both of a creator and a brand integration, is important to a successful partnership, and brands should strive to build lasting relationships with creators rather than one-off campaigns that hurt the authenticity of both the brand and the creator.

We wrote a whole blog post on tips for developing long-term creator relationships, which you can view by clicking here.

Consistently engaging in one-off campaigns without exploring longer-term partnerships can put both brands and creators in jeopardy. Influencer marketing campaigns will feel like advertisements, the possibility of sending a wrong message increases, and there is no access to any substantial data monitoring campaign performance over time.

Related: Can Anyone be a Social Influencer? | Is Influencer Marketing Still Experimental?


4. Utilize content and platform benchmarks

Harnessing content benchmarks to understand which topics resonate with audiences on various social media platforms will ensure that you’re reaching any and all engaged audiences for your creators. It’s rare that a creator only has “influence” on one topic or theme. Though the creator may be regarded as a “beauty influencer,” the creator may also see high performance in other areas such as parenting and pets – which could open up new opportunities to pitch relevant brands with the data showing this “influence.” This can also vary by social media platform. It’s important for both the brand and creator to understand the combination of topics and social media platforms that drive the highest performance and authenticity.

One thing that often holds back influencer marketing strategies is that they only focus on the category or theme that the creator is known for i.e. Beauty. In a beauty creator case study that SYLO compiled, we saw that beauty wasn’t the only theme she utilizes (or that resonates with her audience). For example, across Twitter and YouTube, this beauty creator’s content performed well when it featured product reviews or advice/recommendations, but not so much on Instagram.

Related: Storytelling Insights You Need to Know


5. Cross-promote your social influencer marketing content!

Last summer, SYLO conducted a study analyzing nearly 500 pieces of influencer marketing content produced by creators to see if cross-promoting their YouTube videos led to better performance (measured by the SYLO Score,) We found that YouTube videos that were cross-promoted scored 47% higher than those that weren’t cross-promoted, and creators who had cross-promotions accounting for more than 10% of their branded content saw a 58% higher score on average for that content.

The content study also showed that cross-promotion needs to be a consistent strategy, and one that is tailored to each platform. For example, one creator in the study used the same caption across all of the social media platforms where she cross-promoted her YouTube video. These posts may have performed much better if she had tailored her caption to a content/caption style that typically resonates with her audience on that platform.

Related: Three Tips for Social Influencer Cross-Promotions


6. Show actual performance with clean data and third-party measurement

Digital marketing is under major scrutiny these days. CEOs of major international corporations (P&G, Unilever, Bank of America) are threatening to pull their marketing dollars if companies and platforms (YouTube, Facebook, Instagram, and, to an extent, Google) don’t solve their reporting and measurement problems. In effect, marketers are tired of spending their budget dollars without the safety net that is independent third-party verification and measurement, which builds trust and establishes credibility.

This carries over into influencer marketing, which has massive potential but is sorely lacking when it comes to verification and measurement. If the influencer marketing industry doesn’t start providing marketers with quality data and intelligence, CMOs will pull the plug on influencer marketing media to focus resources and budget on what is actually proving ROI.

Marketers should be also informed when preparing the content and creator strategies for their influencer campaigns. As stated in a recent MarTech Today article, “If you want to be a better marketer, you need to start with clean data.” By utilizing third-party, independent data sources that provide creator, platform, and campaign performance, and content benchmarks, you can truly have a data-driven influencer marketing strategy.

Related: Standardized Measurement Will Help Creators Win Long-Term Brand Partnerships


7. The “bubble” will burst…unless this happens

Several articles have described influencer marketing as a bubble that’s going to burst. Yes, it will burst—as long as brand marketers and CMOs are unsure of the value or metrics being reported.

Third-party measurement in the influencer marketing space can validate the results and truly justify the spend. But, what we need to prevent the influencer marketing bubble from bursting is: Participation! MCNs, vendors, talent managers, creators, agencies, PR firms, and brands all need to get behind a solution, that is third-party standardized measurement. You need a village to make this a reality, with all of the key players in the influencer marketing universe coming together for the betterment of the space.

Related: How the Influencer Marketing Bubble Won’t Burst


8. It’s time to take influencer marketing to the next level

It’s been years since influencer marketing started making a difference on the digital scene (at least in the format we’re familiar with now – first YouTube, and now Instagram, Facebook, and other platforms). We have a growing number of creators (and brands willing to work with them), agencies connecting them to each other, and startups offering all kinds of services to both sides. It’s definitely high time to solve the pressing issue of standardized measurement in influencer marketing so that the industry can continue to develop. SYLO’s innovative approach to this problem enables the influencer marketing community to move the industry forward – learn more at meetsylo.com.

Related: Influencer Marketing in Desperate Need of Verification and Transparency

 

Image source: Pixabay

How the Influencer Marketing “Bubble” Won’t Burst

By Brett Garfinkel, CEO and Co-Founder at SYLO

When winning and executing any type of campaign, a key thought process for media sales teams is that they need to maintain this business to help deliver on or above their set quota. To achieve this, they need to show campaign success so that the brand marketer looks good. When the brand marketer looks good, this increases the media vendor’s chance of gaining repeat business and overachieving on quota.

For media types, such as TV, digital advertising, or website advertising, there are third-party independent measurement solutions to verify and validate this success. The way we know which are the best performing TV shows during Tuesday primetime is because there is standardized reporting – the Nielsen rating.

In the influencer marketing space, there was such no third-party out there where they could see the success. Up until now, reporting is often just creating the story to keep brand marketers satisfied and keep the business coming.

My team has been told this over and over again in meetings with brand marketers. They’re left with the apparent reality that every campaign is a success. We ask, “When was the last time you received a report that showed that your influencer marketing campaign performed poorly?” Answer: *crickets*, and then *chuckles* as they realize the reality of the situation.

It is for that reason that independent, third-party standardized measurement is necessary for the influencer marketing space.

The Current State of the “Bubble”

Several articles have described influencer marketing as a bubble that’s going to burst. Yes, it will burstas long as brand marketers and CMOs are unsure of the value or metrics being reported.

Then, there are a number of vendors who present themselves as all-in-one solutions with matching, execution, and reporting components for influencer marketing campaigns. Can you see how this might introduce conflicting factors when it comes to real, accurate measurement? They have a horse in the race, but are still providing reports.

Perhaps your influencer marketing tech stack includes an influencer identification/matching tool and/or a platform that manages and executes the campaigns. Regardless, you will need a third-party measurement platform to validate the results and truly justify the spend.

The Most Valuable Word in the Influencer Marketing Space

What we need to prevent the influencer marketing bubble from bursting is: Participation! That should be the most valuable word in the influencer marketing space. MCNs, vendors, talent managers, creators, agencies, PR firms, and brands all need to get behind a solution, that is third-party standardized measurement. You need a village to make this a reality, with all of the key players in the influencer marketing universe coming together for the betterment of the space.

There are countless articles quoting top marketers from the likes of P&G, Fiat Chrysler Automobiles U.S., and Unilever, demanding for transparency and accountability in the advertising space. This needs to be demanded for every type of advertising. So, if you believe this, then participateno one entity can make this a reality. For brands and their agencies, standardized measurement will legitimize their reporting and provide confidence in what is succeeding and what is not so that they can tailor and improve their strategies; when you receive conflicting numbers and reports from various sources, there is no moving forward and the “bubble” will burst. And for the talent side, it will bring more budget into the space as there will be actual measured performance, as well as an increased confidence in the brand partnerships, content strategies, and creators themselves.

What is It Worth?

As you increase your influencer marketing spend, and see yourself working with more creators across more platforms, shouldn’t you expect a better understanding of your results via third-party standardized measurement? If the answer is yes, then how much is it worth to you? Not in terms of just budget, but in efficiency and the ability to positively affect your business goals. What is it worth to you to be able to have third-party standardized measurement and content benchmarks that will save you so much time, effort, and money on underperforming campaigns and influencers?

I’d love to hear your answers to the above questions, as well as hear your thoughts and position on what was discussed in this blog post. Please contact me at brett@meetsylo.com to continue this conversation, and you can also visit www.meetsylo.com to learn more about standardized measurement for the influencer marketing space.

 

Image source: Pixabay

What is the SYLO Score?

You asked; we delivered. Introducing SYLO’s brand new explainer video to help you understand what the SYLO Score is: why it’s needed, how it’s calculated, and the benefits of utilizing 3rd-party standardized measurement to drive your influencer marketing strategies. Find out more at meetsylo.com or contact us directly at contact@meetsylo.com!

Influencer Marketing in Desperate Need of Verification and Transparency

By Brett Garfinkel, CEO and Co-Founder at SYLO

Influencer marketing is an industry open to everyone. Much like the Wild West of yore, it’s full of opportunity lurking around every corner – barriers to entry are minimal and pretty much anybody can start creating content with the goal of partnering with a brand somewhere down the line.

Does this mean that the industry is all sunshine and roses?

Of course not.

Influencer Marketing Threatened by the Lack of Standardized Measurement

Where there’s ample opportunity, there’s ample danger. Now that there’s plenty of land to stake a claim on, there should also be at least a semblance of order. Digital marketing is under major scrutiny these days. CEOs of major international corporations (P&G, Unilever, Bank of America) are threatening to pull their marketing dollars if companies and platforms (YouTube, Facebook, Instagram, and, to an extent, Google) don’t solve their reporting and measurement problems.

In effect, marketers are tired of spending their budget dollars without the safety net that is independent third-party verification and measurement, which builds trust and establishes credibility. This carries over into Influencer marketing, which has massive potential but is sorely lacking when it comes to verification and measurement.

How much longer will marketers spend money on a marketing strategy that’s difficult to compare with other media buys; a strategy that defies benchmarking and that is in dire need of a tool which will act as a single source of truth?

In my opinion, if the influencer industry doesn’t wise up soon and start providing marketers with quality intelligence (and not just data), CMOs will pull the plug on influencer marketing media and, instead, focus resources and budgets on what is actually proving ROI. A promising industry (that’s providing value to marketers, creators, and publishers) will then be left on the fringe, without ever realizing its full potential.

What Can Be Gained from Standardized Measurement?

Marketers need standardized measurement to track and justify their investments. Also, platforms would welcome standardized measurement, especially if that is the only way they can keep taking their slice of the pie.

As for the creator community, there are two core benefits here that need to be considered.

The first is money. Marketing budgets might be tight (at least judging from the P&Gs reaction) but the purse strings are easily unleashed for strategies that truly work. However, marketers have issues with paying for dubious results or strategies they can’t measure and benchmark. Until they can do that, influencer marketing will stay in the realm of experimental, and so will the budgets allocated to it.

The second benefit is innovation. Standardized measurement gives marketers the opportunity to work on scale – it allows them to easily run campaigns on different platforms while gathering valuable insight. With more money, creators can afford to be more innovative with their content, seeking out formats that work across different channels. Since they can now see what’s effective, finding content solutions that perform well on Twitter, Instagram, Facebook, and YouTube becomes that much easier. As a consequence, creators will become more daring and will push the envelope when it comes to the content they create.

It’s Time to Take Influencer Marketing to the Next Level

It’s been years since influencer marketing started making a difference on the digital scene (at least in the format we’re familiar with now – first YouTube, and now Instagram, Facebook, and other platforms). We have a growing number of creators and brands willing to work with them, agencies connecting them to each other, and startups offering all kinds of services to both sides. It’s definitely high time to solve the pressing issue of standardized measurement in influencer marketing so that the industry can continue to develop. SYLO’s innovative approach to this problem adds order to this “Wild West” and enables the influencer marketing community to move the industry forward – learn more at meetsylo.com!

Photo credit: Pixabay

Can Anyone be a Social Influencer?

By Erick Schwab, COO and Co-Founder at SYLO

I recently read a Fashionista article which presented a comprehensive review of the various influencer marketing platforms out there, some of which allow anyone to sign up and connect with brands, and others being more selective. The article concludes with the quote, “It feels safe to assume that as time goes on, it will only become easier for anyone to join in on the influencer economy. And depending on your perspective, that’s either an exciting and empowering, or very scary, prospect. Or both.”

A short time later, I was watching Disney Pixar’s “The Incredibles” with my kids and came to the scene when the bad guy, Syndrome, explains his master evil scheme. As the movie builds to the climax, Mr. Incredible accuses Syndrome of pretending to be a superhero (since all of his “powers” are technology-driven) and Syndrome responds: “Oh, I’m real. Real enough to defeat *you*! And I did it without your precious gifts, your oh-so-special powers. I’ll give them heroics. I’ll give them the most spectacular heroics anyone’s ever seen! And when I’m old and I’ve had my fun, I’ll sell my inventions so that everyone can be superheroes. *Everyone* can be super! And when everyone’s super…*no one* will be.

On a completely innocent scale, this is what we are seeing happen now in the influencer space: technology is enabling anyone and everyone to declare herself or himself an “influencer.”

On the one hand, any of us can be an influencer in the most literal sense: co-workers, friends, family, acquaintances, strangers, and pets can influence our decisions and views all day long, whether it be in-person or online. On the other hand, in the realm of influencer marketing, brand marketers should be focusing on “creators” rather than just “influencers” – and if they’re going to use these two words synonymously – then no, not everyone can be an “influencer”.

Those creators utilized in influencer marketing campaigns are “special” because they are authentic, talented in specific areas, and carry authority on specific topics. It comes down to an individual who exudes creativity and innovation in their content creation – something you can’t fake, and can’t only come about because there is technology that enables you to be labeled as an “influencer.” The ability to position yourself and successfully resonate and build relationships with thousands, tens of thousands, even millions of people – that’s a talent.

This is why brands can’t solely pick “influencers” by their followings. Brands and creators alike need to harness reach, consumption, and engagement data to truly understand the influence that the creator has on their subject matter. Creators naturally produce content across a variety of areas because it’s an expression of themselves and their lives and, unsurprisingly, each piece of content they create will not have the same influence among their fans.

Finally, not only do the “influencers” need to be authentic creators, but brands looking to partner with them should focus on authentic relationships with these creators. Authenticity, both of a creator and a brand integration, is important to a successful partnership. It’s been written time and time again, but well worth reinforcing that brands should strive to build lasting relationships with creators rather than one-off campaigns that hurt the authenticity of both the brand and the creator.

Brands and creators, how do you approach partnerships for influencer marketing campaigns?

If you are a brand or creator who needs third-party insights into your social content’s performance across influencer marketing campaigns and industry-leading marketing verticals, check out SYLO here: www.meetsylo.com.

Photo credit: Pixabay

Advertisers Already Know How to Tackle Influencer Marketing Measurement

By Erick Schwab, COO & Co-Founder at SYLO

What is happening now with influencer marketing is a tale as old as time (in advertising).

Back in 2006, I was with ManiaTV and tasked with figuring out how to sell Fortune 500 brands and their agencies original, live-streaming content. Shows were hosted by a bunch of young twenty-somethings that were starting to grow a loyal audience. The journey was helping brands understanding what this new media could do for their business, in order to reach their consumers in a completely new way. It involved the need to convert live-streaming into media sales, creating advertising packages around impressions and CPMs so media buyers, who didn’t know what this form of media was, could measure it.

Measurement has always been a passion point – in selling sponsorships, I would proactively include brand surveys to get brand and favorability lifts to help media buyers understand their investment and what was really happening. Was it actually working? Was it helping their business?

Fast forward to 2012 when the MCN world started to push through more than ever, and the same thing was happening as it is now with influencers: their audience went through the roof and demand from advertisers followed. If a brand wanted to integrate with a particular influencer, the brand would just spend a flat fee with no measurement to support it. The Global Online Video Association (GOVA), which I was a part of at the time, tried to understand how the MCNs were selling/packaging this inventory to try to get a sense of consistency in the space.

Now, in the past 5 years, Instagram’s user growth shot up and Snapchat hit the scene. There are several of these social media platforms that brands are trying to navigate, and everyone is operating differently with varying metrics. There have been so many articles on successful influencer marketing campaigns, but let me pose this question to you: How can you measure campaign performance without a baseline/standardized metric?

This is why I started SYLO along with my co-founder Brett Garfinkel: to give influencer marketing, the latest exploding form of media, a standardized measurement system that appeases the demand by both brands and influencers.

A recent Digiday article addressed the absence of media buyers in discussions to set programmatic standards. However, we took the opposite approach when building the standard for influencer marketing. Throughout the year of research we did to determine how we were going to build the algorithm to calculate our SYLO Score, we went straight to the media buyers to get their buy-in on what metrics dictate campaign performance, and how we should weigh these metrics in our algorithm. Brand marketers need this standardized measurement and reporting for their influencer campaigns and, therefore, they were a key component and resource in building the SYLO Score.

Check out our recent press containing insights from industry leaders on the importance of third-party measurement standard for the influencer marketing space.

Photo credit: Pixabay